Looking to buy a toy for a chassidic cousin?

Look up “Mitzvah Kinder” on Amazon. Kinder is Yiddish for children, and the mitzvah children are a Jewish answer to Fisher-Price.

03-2-L-Mk101-2As with any good children’s toy, the little figures are collectible and available in a wide variety of sets. One set has pegs to fit the chassidic dolls who come in the box into a Fisher-Price school bus.

03-3-L-mk103The “Mitzvah Menschen” expansion set includes “Herschel from Hatzolah,” “Pinchus the Postman,” “Mendy the Fireman,” and “Brucha from Bikur Cholim.”

“Tovya the Construction Worker” is available separately.

Not everyone in this world of pretend is chassidic. There’s a “Litvish” expansion featuring men wearing non-chassidic charedi hats.

Shabbos with the Mitzvah Kinder Set includes a family, a Shabbos table, candle sticks, a bowl of soup, and a plate of fish.

The chasunah set — that’s Yiddish for wedding — boasts 60 pieces, including the bride and groom, tables with cakes, a keyboard player, a singer reminiscent of chassidic superstar Lipa Schmeltzer — and a two-piece attractive pink mechitzah to separate the women dolls from the men. The boys’ cake table is in blue, and the one for the girls is in pink, so there won’t be any mistake about which doll goes where.

Of course, there’s a shul set, which includes Torah scrolls, a Torah ark, and a tallis. And there’s a seforim room — that would be a library in English — featuring bookcases, books, a menorah, and three figures. The side panel of the box explains: “Totty Learns Torah, Tuli Learns With Totty, Faigy Serves Totty & Tuli.” (Totty, for the non-Yiddish-speakers among us, means father.)

And that’s how the Mitzvah Kinder ended up in the Facebook group for Orthodox feminists.

cropped faigy