Well, this is reassuring news.

It turns out that charedi taboos against seeing images of women do not discriminate on the basis of national origin, skin color, or fictional identity.

Posters promoting “Smurfs: The Lost Village” have gone up across Israel, as theaters release children’s films for the Passover vacation.

The standard poster for the film shows four of the short, blue-skinned humanoids, originally created by a Belgian cartoonist in 1958. Among them is Smurfette, easily distinguishable by her long blonde hair and six cartoon eyelashes.

Except for the posters hanging in the ultra-Orthodox town of Bnei Brak.

There, the film’s distribution company decided to erase the blue-bodied beauty from posters in order not to offend residents, according to the Israeli daily Haaretz, which printed a photo of the poster showing only the three male Smurfs. The company, Forum Film, also told Haaretz that it is common practice not to feature women on posters in Bnei Brak.

JTA Wire Service